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« Alzheimer's Action Plan Signed Into Law | Main | Alzheimer's Research News »

March 27, 2011

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Comments

Greg

I have a friend whose husband recently passed away after 4 years of struggling through dementia.

She has written a book that helps people to deal with all the aspects of caretaking for someone afflicted by this difficult disease.

From spiritual to practical to personal difficulties, she gives a blow by blow delivery of the myriad circumstances that caretakers of dementia stricken patients must deal with...and how to delicately handle all the aspects of their loved one's problem. The book is called Into The Mist - Journey Into Dementia by Kathleen Beard. She has a current blog as well. You can read about it here. http://intothemistbook.com/book-preview

Sue

Hi Greg: thanks for the information on the new book. I had not heard of it as yet.

Thanks for writing.

Sue

Cara Larose

Maybe there are some people like me confused about the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's. Before I chanced upon this blog, I've read some articles about them. Both diseases can be badly happening to anyone. It's really hard to accept that one of our loved ones has this disease, but we should do it, and must show support and love to them. Thankfully, it would be easier to find a home for patients who have dementia. Just keep in mind that you check the background of the health attendant to ensure your loved one is safe.

Blog Specialist

While little can be done to improve dementia in those who suffer, family members who find emotional distress in the hardship of Alzheimer Disease can call for therapy to find better methods of coping.

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